Question Period: When will the Government Change its Failed Natural Resource Policy?

In Question Period on March 3, I continued to press the government on how its failed natural resource policy has contributed to the tragedy in Ukraine by funding Putin's war machine, and by limiting European options for purchasing gas from elsewhere (like Canada).

A decade ago, Canada had 14 LNG proposals on the table - today, there is just one under construction. Canadian LNG not only gives the world the option not to buy from rogue states, but also contributes to environmental goals when it replaces higher emission products such as coal. These are previous policy choices that now have obvious consequences. When will the government revise its regulatory regime to allow Canadian natural gas to get to tidewater?

(Text of the questions and answers follows the video)

    Mr. Greg McLean (Calgary Centre, CPC): Mr. Speaker, with an aggressive Russian invasion of Ukraine, European countries recognize how dependent they are on Russian gas supplies. Forty per cent of Europe’s gas comes from Russia and Europe’s security now has a gun to its head. Coal Plants are being brought back online, undoing years of progress on emission reductions. Energy and security analysts have been warning about this danger for years. The government has lacked Canadian vision on this matter.

    When will the government end its efforts to replace Canadian energy with offshore resources from hostile regimes?

    Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, given the brutal invasion of Ukraine, European countries have very much made clear their decision to end dependence on Russian oil and gas. European countries have made it clear, including during this week's meeting of the International Energy Agency ministerial, of the pressing need for Europe to accelerate the transition to renewables and hydrogen. We are conferring and working closely with our allies on short and long-term options for stabilizing and ensuring access to long-term energy supply. I am engaged directly with our American and European counterparts and we are steadfast in our support for Ukraine and our European allies.

    Mr. Greg McLean (Calgary Centre, CPC): Mr. Speaker, it is an interesting approach, but since the government came to power, Russia’s natural gas exports have increased 35% and Canada’s exports have declined. The result? Tens of billions of dollars have flowed to fund Putin's war machine.

    A decade ago, Canada had 14 LNG projects preparing to supply energy to an insecure world. Now, thanks to the government’s aimless policies none are build and only one is under construction. This is a choice with now obvious consequences.

    Will the government revise its regulatory regime to allow Canadian natural gas to get to tidewater?

    Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier in the chamber this week, we have made the decision to ban the importation of all petroleum products from Russia. We are working actively with our European colleagues to ensure both short-term and long-term access to energy supplies. We are working very, very proactively with the energy sector in this country, including with the Pathways alliance, to ensure we are producing our energy resources in a manner that is consistent with addressing the climate crisis.